Thursday, August 16, 2018

Nurses Who Vaccinate Announces Partnership with Shot@Life

 
In honor of National Immunization Awareness Month, Nurses Who Vaccinate, a non-profit organization, announced their official partnership with the United Nations Foundation’s Shot@Life Campaign.  This partnership will provide network of nurses and members who are enthusiastic and engaged, and connect them with Shot@life's mission to stand up for children around the world. It will expand the efforts to champion global childhood immunizations through grassroots advocacy and awareness raising activities.


“As a long time supporter of Shot@Life, Nurses Who Vaccinate has worked side by side S@L to raise awareness of the need for children everywhere to receive life-saving vaccinations,” said Melody Butler, BSN, RN, CIC, Executive Director of Nurses Who Vaccinate. “As public health advocates, Nurses Who Vaccinate members encourage patients, colleagues, and communities to learn about, advocate for, and provide access to immunizations.  Becoming an official partner with Shot@Life to build global awareness of the need for childhood immunizations, fits naturally within our mission.”


NWV members meet fellow S@L Champion Jo Frost
Despite great advances, worldwide each year, 1.5 million children still die from vaccine preventable diseases.  Shot@Life and Nurses Who Vaccinate will work together to stand up for childhood and give children everywhere a shot a healthy life. The two organizations believe that no matter where they live, every child deserves a shot at life.






Shot@Life, a campaign of the United Nations Foundation, educates, connects and empowers individuals to champion global vaccines as one of the most effective ways to save the lives of children in developing countries. The campaign rallies the public to advocate and fundraise for global childhood vaccines. Shot@Life believes that by encouraging people to learn about, advocate for, and donate to  vaccines, we can decrease the 1.5 million annual vaccine-preventable childhood deaths and give every child a shot at a healthy life. Go to www.ShotAtLife.org to learn more.



NWV Members attend Shot@Life's Annual Summit

Thursday, August 9, 2018

Your Pregnancy: Protecting Your Baby Starts Now




National Immunization Awareness Month is a reminder everyone needs vaccines throughout their lives.

 

From the moment you found out you were pregnant, you started protecting your baby. You might have changed the way you eat, started taking a prenatal vitamin or researched the kind of car seat to buy. But did you know that one of the best ways to start protecting your baby against serious diseases is by getting flu and Tdap vaccines while you are pregnant?

 

The vaccines you get during your pregnancy will provide your baby with some disease protection (immunity) that can last during the first months of life after birth. By getting vaccinated during pregnancy, you can pass antibodies to your baby that may help protect against diseases. This early protection is critical for diseases like flu and whooping cough because babies are at their greatest risk of severe illness from these diseases in their first months of life, but they are also too young to get the vaccines against these illnesses. Passing maternal antibodies during pregnancy is the only way to help directly protect them from flu and whooping cough (pertussis).

 


In cases when doctors can determine who spread whooping cough to an infant, the mother was sometimes the source. Once you have protection from the Tdap shot, you are less likely to spread whooping cough to your newborn baby.

 

When it comes to flu, even if you are generally healthy, changes in immune, heart and lung functions during pregnancy make you more likely to have a severe case of the flu if you catch it. If you catch the flu when you are pregnant, you also have a higher chance of being hospitalized. Getting a flu shot will help protect you and your baby.

 

You can rest assured these vaccines are very safe for you and your baby. Millions of pregnant women have safely received flu shots for many years and CDC continues to monitor safety data on flu vaccine in pregnant women.

 

The whooping cough vaccine (Tdap) is also safe for you and your baby. Doctors and midwives who specialize in caring for pregnant women agree that the whooping cough vaccine is important to get during the third trimester of each pregnancy. Getting the vaccine during pregnancy will not put you at increased risk for pregnancy complications.

 

You should get your whooping cough vaccine between your 27th and 36th week of pregnancy, preferably during the earlier part of that period. You can get a flu shot during any trimester. You may receive whooping cough and flu vaccines at the same time or at different prenatal care visits. If you are pregnant during flu season, you should get a flu vaccine as soon as the vaccine is available, by October if possible.

 

If you want to learn more about pregnancy and vaccines, talk to your ob-gyn or midwife, and visit https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/pregnancy/pregnant-women/index.html.

CDC, 2018 National Public Health Information Coalition

 

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Member of Nursing Community Speaks up Against Violence towards Pro-Vaccine Healthcare Workers

I became an advocate of ending healthcare worker violence ever since I heard about Nurse Alex. (Alex Wubbels, is the nurse who was arrested for refusing to let a police officer draw blood from an unconscious patient.)

So, when I came across this statement from Dr. Jim Meehan, an ophthalmologist, and an anti-vaccine advocate, and I was immediately horrified.








I had to speak up. I wrote Dr. Meehan a letter in an attempt to reach out peacefully and ask to discourage violence towards healthcare workers.


Dear Dr. Meehan

Your statement you recently wrote deeply concerned me. I feel the need to speak up.

Please don’t encourage violence towards healthcare workers. Please don’t threaten them. I understand that people get angry when a loved one becomes sick or disabled, but that is no reason to resort to violence or threats.

In light of what happened to Nurse Alex, all the nurses were outraged by her wrongful arrest and assault. They dedicated to defending her and making sure justice was served.

So please don’t incite violence towards healthcare workers. As someone who works in healthcare, please reconsider what you said. They don’t deserve it. I’m sure you wouldn’t like being threatened or assaulted either.

Thank you for listening. Peace be with you.


I have not received a response.

I saw that the blog link was shared on his Twitter page. I asked him kindly about discouraging violence towards healthcare workers. My response was met with a hostile remark:



Kate Doyle: “Please discourage pharmaceutical and medical assault on healthcare workers. Peace be with you.”
Jim Meehan, MD: “Please discourage pharmaceutical and medical assault children. Peace be with you.”


I am disgusted and disappointed that someone who is a healthcare worker seems so disregarding towards this topic. However, I do feel proud that I spoke up about this. I want to encourage all healthcare workers to speak up when someone talks like this, and threatened our fellow colleagues.

By sharing my story, I hope to bring awareness to the fact that there are social media users calling for violence against pro-science and pro-vaccine advocates.

We cannot tolerate this violent threatening behavior, especially when it comes from within our own community.
#silentnomore






Kate Doyle is a member of Nurses Who Vaccinate. She is currently a CNA, studying to be a RN, Army wife, and has two children.


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Friday, August 25, 2017

DO YOU HAVE A PRETEEN OR TEEN? PROTECT THEIR FUTURE WITH VACCINES.


National Immunization Awareness Month is a reminder that we all need vaccines throughout our lives.

Taking them to their sports physical, making sure they eat healthy and get plenty of sleep…you know these are crucial to your child’s health. But did you also you know your preteens and teens need vaccines to stay healthy and protected against serious diseases?

To celebrate the importance of immunizations for people of all ages – and make sure preteens and teens are protected with all the vaccines they need – Nurses Who Vaccinate joined with partners nationwide in recognizing August as National Immunization Awareness Month.

As they get older, preteens and teens are at increased risk for some infections. Plus the protection provided by some of the childhood vaccines begins to wear off, so preteens need an additional dose (booster) to “boost” immunity. You may have heard about whooping cough (pertussis) outbreaks recently. Vaccine-preventable diseases are still around and very real. The vaccines for preteens and teens can help protect your kids, as well as their friends, community, and other family members.








There are four vaccines recommended for all preteens at ages 11 to 12:

Meningococcal conjugate vaccine, which protects against four types of the bacteria that cause meningococcal disease. Meningococcal disease is an uncommon but serious disease that can cause infections of the lining of the brain and spinal cord (meningitis) and blood (septicemia). Since protection decreases over time, a booster dose is recommended at age 16 so teens continue to have protection during the ages when they are at highest risk for getting meningococcal disease. Teens and young adults (16 through 23 year olds) may also receive a serogroup B meningococcal vaccine, preferably at 16 through 18 years old.

HPV vaccine, which protects against the types of HPV that most commonly cause cancer. HPV can cause future cancers of the cervix, vulva and vagina in women and cancers of the penis in men. In both women and men, HPV also causes cancers in the back of the throat (including base of the tongue and tonsils), anal cancer and genital warts.

Tdap vaccine, which protects against tetanus, diphtheria, and whooping cough. Tetanus and diphtheria are uncommon now because of vaccines, but they can be very serious. Whooping cough is common and on the rise in the United States. It can keep kids out of school and activities for weeks, but it is most dangerous — and sometimes even deadly — for babies who can catch it from family members, including older siblings.

Influenza (flu) vaccine, because even healthy kids can get the flu, and it can be serious. All kids, including your preteens and teens, should get the flu vaccine every year. Parents should also get vaccinated to protect themselves and to help protect their children from the flu.



You can use any health care visit, including sports or camp physicals, checkups or some sick visits, to get the shots your kids need. Talk with your child’s health care professional to find out which vaccines your preteens and teens need. Vaccines are a crucial step in keeping your kids healthy.

Want to learn more about the vaccines for preteens and teens? Check out www.cdc.gov/vaccines/teens or call 1-800-CDC-INFO


The National Public Health Information Coalition (NPHIC) is an independent organization of professionals sought after to improve America's health through public health communications.

Saturday, May 27, 2017

Why Nurses Need to Advocate for Patients to Recieve Chickenpox Vaccine

Nurses, do you have unpleasant memories of getting the chickenpox when you were young? Some of us may remember having an uncomfortable rash, staying home from school for a week, and trying not to scratch the scabs. Some may even remember the oatmeal baths that did not work as promised.

Many nurses were told that "It is a rite of passage" because all of their friends got it—It was just "part of growing up." With chickenpox being as contagious as it it, it was no wonder so many caught it. One child can spread it to another from 1 to 2 days before they get the rash until all their chickenpox blisters have formed scabs (usually 5-7 days).

But, now, our patients don’t have to suffer the way we did, because there’s a vaccine to protect them against chickenpox.


Before the chickenpox vaccine became available in 1995, nearly 11,000 people were hospitalized every year and about 50 children died. The disease can cause serious complications, even in healthy children. These complications include skin infections, lung infections (pneumonia), swelling of the brain, bleeding problems, blood stream infections (sepsis), and dehydration. In Pakistan, 2017 has brought at least 17 deaths from chickenpox, and the year is only half way. Earlier this year, a 6 year old girl died enroute to a London hospital from complications associated with varicella. 

“The most important thing to remember is that we cannot predict which child will get a serious case or have complications from the chickenpox,” explained Dr. Stephanie Bialek at the CDC. “The chickenpox vaccine is very safe, and about 90% of kids who get both recommended doses of the chickenpox vaccine are protected against the disease. Therefore, we recommend that children get vaccinated.”

CDC recommends pediatric patients receive the first dose of the chickenpox vaccine at age 12 through 15 months old and the second at age 4 through 6 years. Some children do get the disease even after they are vaccinated, but it’s usually milder. Children who get chickenpox after vaccination typically have fewer red spots or blisters and mild or no fever. The chickenpox vaccine prevents almost all cases of severe disease. If a patient has only received one dose in the past, check to see if they can qualify for a second dose.

Have an adult patient questioning whether they should get the varicella vaccine? All adults who never received the chickenpox vaccine and never had the chickenpox should receive the vaccine. If they are unsure about their vaccine statues, it's recommended by experts that they receive the vaccine. Adults who are at higher risk of exposure should especially consider vaccination. They include healthcare workers, college students, teachers, and daycare workers. 



Nurses need to be strong advocates in encouraging patients and families to vaccinate for chickenpox. A strong recommendation can go a long way in preventing unnecessary suffering and even death.

If you have questions about the childhood immunization schedule, you can find more information about vaccines here. Looking for more information about chickenpox? Click here.

Saturday, December 17, 2016

An Important Change this Flu Season: The Injectable Vaccine is Better than the Nasal Spray

Each year, the Centers for Disease control recommends that all healthy people ages 6 months and older get their annual influenza vaccines as early into the season as possible.
For this 2016-2017 influenza season, there is one important change: everyone should get the injectable form instead of the live nasal mist vaccine which may not be as effective. 

Source: http://philcoiinetnetau.blogspot.com/2011_03_01_archive.html
Influenza can be deadly for everyone but especially for children, older adults and those who are immunocompromised. The CDC estimates that about 114,000 people are hospitalized each year for influenza.

It’s very challenging to determine the number of deaths which may be attributed to influenza but the CDC estimates CDC estimates that the number of influenza-related deaths can range from as low as 3,000 to as high as 49,000 people each influenza season.

The annual influenza season typically begins around October but varies based on the first reported cases of influenza. During most influenza seasons, flu activity generally peaks between December and March. During some seasons, positive cases of influenza have continued as late as May.
To build immunity before flu season peaks in the winter, the CDC recommends that flu vaccines be offered as early as possible and flu vaccines are generally available in late August or early September.
Some people worry that if they get the flu vaccine too early into the season that it won’t be effective for the duration of the season. For most healthy adults under age 65, getting the vaccine as early as possible helps to ensure your immune system has time to build an adequate response and that your protection lasts throughout the flu season.
For older adults above the age of 65, their immunity to the flu vaccine may start to decrease throughout the season so FLUAD, a higher dose vaccine with an added adjuvant to enhance the immune response, is recommended for this age group.
It’s especially important that healthcare workers and anyone who works closely with young children or young adults get their annual flu vaccines to ensure that we don’t inadvertently contract influenza and spread it to these vulnerable populations.

As a Registered Nurse, I provide care for many adults whose immune systems are compromised due to current infections or diseases such as COPD, diabetes and cardiac dysfunction. I got my flu vaccine at work early September, and of course, I took my third annual FluShotSelfie since I’ve become a nurse. I always encourage my coworkers to get their flu vaccines as early as possible and encourage them to post their vaccine selfies as well.
I offer the flu vaccine to each and every one of my eligible patients and offer education to them when they are feeling hesitant or unsure about whether they actually need the vaccine. “Are you alive?” I jokingly ask my patients. When they reply, “yes,” I always smile and tell them that the flu vaccine is definitely for them, then!
Whether you’re working with patients or not, getting a flu vaccine each year is a fantastic way to protect yourselves, your families and your communities!
If you do choose to get your flu shot, be sure to share it with us or post a picture to your social media accounts and use the following hashtags:

Friday, December 9, 2016

Silly Rabbit, Flu Shots Aren't Just For Kids!


Growing up, I used to hide the Trix cereal from my parents. In my defense, I was only following the directions from the advertisements I saw on television. You know the ones. The Trix commercials featured a rabbit, whose name is 'coincidentally' Tricks, and in every commercial he continually attempted to trick children into giving him a bowl of cereal. He was discovered every time; and the kids who would reclaim the cereal would say, "Silly rabbit, Trix are for kids!"
So of course, I'd hide the cereal and when my parents would find it, behind the couch, in the closet, under the table... I'd tell them, "Silly dad, Trix are for kids, not dads!"


Flash forward several years later, I'm chatting with a friend who is the parent of young children. She mentions that her children had just received their flu shots and were most upset that the doctor's office was out of stickers than the actual administration of the vaccine itself. I asked her when she was planning on getting hers, and she looked me, like I was being silly and said, "Flu shots are just for kids, I don't need one, right?"


With that, I went into nurse-mode and responded, "You don't need one if you don't mind chancing a risk of contracting the flu virus, getting sick and possibly transmitting to your family, and yes even those who have been vaccinated, are still at risk. People of every age, including people in good health, are at risk of flu." She was shocked, because like others, she thought the influenza vaccine was just recommended for children and immunocompromised patients. I gave her a bit more information about influenza. Like how the CDC recommends that everyone 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine every year by the end of October, if possible. I told her, getting vaccinated later is OK.  It's not too late to vaccinate throughout the flu season, even in January or later. I also shared that although a majority of hospitalizations and deaths occur in people 65 years and older, even healthy young children and younger adults can have severe disease or even die from influenza.


Which brings us to this year's National Influenza Vaccination Week's 2016 key message- It's not too late to get a flu shot and everyone should get one.


With the holiday season among us, we're spending time with loved ones, participating in community events and ultimately taking part in activities that allow for an easy transmission of the flu virus. Flu activity is usually highest between December and February, though activity can last as late as May. As long as flu activity is ongoing, it’s not too late to get vaccinated, even in January or later.


As a nurse, I frequently tell my patients and my friends that not only does a flu vaccine protect you, it also protects your loved ones from the flu. Getting vaccinated protests those around you, including
those who are more vulnerable to serious flu illness, like babies and young children, older people, and
people with certain chronic health conditions.

The flu virus is spread mostly by direct contact and droplets. When a sick person coughs or sneezes, virus droplets can travel six feet or more. If you're in close quarters, like most families, one sick family member will very easily transmit the virus to other family members.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), “most healthy adults are able to infect other people beginning day before symptoms develop and up to 5 to 7 days after becoming sick.”


As per the CDC, community immunity is “When a critical portion of a community is immunized against a contagious disease, most members of the community are protected against that disease because there is little opportunity for an outbreak. Even those who are not eligible for certain vaccines — such as very young infants or immunocompromised individuals — get some protection because the spread of contagious disease is contained.”

When the overwhelming majority of people are vaccinated, our communities are kept safe. Do your part, protect your family by getting your yearly influenza vaccine. Take it from Nurses Who Vaccinate members, who know that unlike breakfast cereal, Flu Shots aren't just for kids!



"As a nurse, I take my role as a patient advocate seriously. Advocating for my patients also means protecting them, which is why I always get my annual flu shot. Getting vaccinated against the flu keeps me safe and helps prevent the spread of infection to the vulnerable people that I'm caring for during my shifts. The flu can be deadly for anyone of any age, and getting vaccinated is a great way to keep the entire community safe!" -Angela Daly, RN, Cardiac Float Nurse

"I'm a single mother of one. My fully vaccinated daughter learned the value of vaccines when she had the flu at age 6 in 1992. When she was well enough, I explained how she could prevent becoming so ill. Not only does she stay up-to-date on vaccines including an annual flu shot as an adult, she chose to participate in HPV trials while away at college." -Joan E, DrPH, RN, School Nurse

"As a rural nurse in Mexico I saw firsthand pain and sorrow of mothers who lost a child to a vaccine preventable disease. Later, as an educator and mother of three, I was the first one to get vaccinate annually against the flu and I made sure the my children understood the importance of being fully vaccinate to protect them from deadly diseases when they were younger. They learn that having their annual flu shots will protect them from flu and for spreading infections to others. Educating the mothers about the importance of vaccines is a must and a responsibility to keep our families healthy and our communities free of diseases." -Felisa Hilbert, RN, Global Health advocate.

"As a former Oncology nurse, turned NICU nurse, I have cared for many patients who are immunocompromised, and cannot receive vaccines. I vaccinate my family because vaccination not only protect them against diseases, it helps build herd immunity to protect those who truly are unable to be vaccinated, because they are either too young or too immunocompromised." -Ashley Balestriere, BSN, RN, Neonatal Intensive Care Nurse


"My family of four, plus one furry friend, is fully protected against vaccine-preventable disease. Whooping cough is currently circulating in our community, and I'm relieved to know that we have done everything we can to insure that our family will be healthy, and that we've done our bit to stop its spread." - Leah Russin, mom, lawyer, community member. 



It's not too late to get a flu shot!
CDC kicked off their NIVW Blog-a-thon on Monday, December 5. Checkout other participating blogs here. Share your own post on social media using the hashtag #NIVW2016 and #fightflu, and download your own CDC Flu Blog-a-thon badge, here (http://www.cdc.gov/flu/nivw/webtools.htm). !